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Quit Smoking

The tobacco industry has invested millions of dollars in cigarettes to make sure they are really hard to quit. While it's hard, it's not impossible. And you are guaranteed to be sexier once you quit. Scientists have proven it!

So how can you make it happen? Quitting takes practice and a plan makes it easier. First remember this:

What does this mean? If you are serious about quitting, it is going to take patience, some planning, some tools, and help from friends. The best place to start is the Quitline. It’s totally free and really helpful. They can help you make a plan and learn from others who have succeeded.

HERE'S WHERE TO CALL

NEED MORE REASONS TO QUIT?

HERE'S WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR BODY AFTER YOU QUIT SMOKING

20 minutes

Blood pressure and pulse return to normal

8 hours

oxygen levels return to normal


Nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in blood reduce by half

12 hours

Carbon monoxide levels in blood drop to normal

24 hours

Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body

Lungs start to clear out mucous and other smoking debris

48 hours

There is no nicotine left in the body

Ability to taste and smell is greatly improved

72 hours

Breathing becomes easier

Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase

2-12 weeks

Circulation improves

Lung function increases

3-9 Months

Coughs, wheezing and breathing problems improve as lung functions are increased by up to 10%

12 Months

Excess risk of coronary heart disease is reduced by about half and declines gradually hereafter

5 years

Risk of heart attack falls to about half that of a smoker

Risk of stroke returns to the level of people who have never smoked (5 - 15 years)

10 Years

Risk of lung cancer falls to about half that of a smoker

15 years

Risk of lung cancer is reduced to close to that observed in nonsmokers

Risk of coronary heart disease falls to the same as someone who has never smoked

If you have quit smoking before age 50 you have halved the risk of dying in the next 15 years compared with continuing smokers